EU Joins U.S. in Economic Tit for Tat with Russia

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Matryoshkas showing Joseph Stalin next to US President Barrack Obama are for sale at an art and handicrafts market in Chisinau, Moldova on March 20, 2014. The president of the former Soviet republic of Moldova March 19 called on the European Union to speed up his country’s integration, as Moscow tightened its grip on #Crimea. Pro-Western President Nicolae Timofti’s appeal came a day after he cautioned Moscow against trying to annex Moldova’s breakaway region of Transdniestr as President Vladimir Putin signed a historic treaty to make Crimea part of Russia. Officials in Russian-speaking Transdniestr earlier reportedly appealed to lawmakers in Moscow to pass legislation that could see the region absorbed into Russia.
Russian lawmakers have moved forward on a treaty formalizing the accession of Crimea, sparking an economic tit for tat between the U.S. and Russia. The Russian Foreign Ministry responded within minutes, after the U.S. announced tougher sanctions for Russia’s moves in the Crimean peninsula. CCTV’s Jim Spellman reports on the developments.

Follow Jim Spellman on Twitter @jimspellmanTV 

The European Union has also intensified its sanctions against Russia in response to the Crimea crisis. European Union leaders imposed sanctions on 12 more Russian leaders during a summit in Brussels. CCTV’s Sandra Gathmann reports.

Follow Sandra Gathmann on Twitter@SandraGathmann

Meanwhile, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon has reached the Russian capital in an effort to calm tensions. It is his first visit to Moscow since the crisis began and the UN chief expressed quote “deep concerns” over the developments in the region.
CCTV’s Natalie Feary has more.

Follow Natalie Feary on Twitter @nataliefeary